пятница, 2 ноября 2007 г.

Avelox

Generic name: Moxifloxacin hydrochloride
Why is Avelox prescribed?
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Avelox, an antibiotic, is prescribed to treat sinus and lung infections. It kills bacteria that can cause sinusitis, pneumonia, and secondary infections in chronic bronchitis. It also fights skin infections caused by staph or strep.

Avelox is a member of the quinolone family of antibiotics. Like all antibiotics, Avelox works only against bacteria. It will not cure an infection caused by a virus.
Most important fact about Avelox
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In rare cases, antibiotics can cause a serious allergic reaction. Stop taking Avelox and call your doctor immediately if you develop any of the following warning signs: skin rash, tingling, hives, shortness of breath, swelling of the face or throat, or difficulty swallowing.
How should you take Avelox?
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Avelox may be taken with or without food. Your doctor will only prescribe Avelox to treat a bacterial infection; it will not cure a viral infection, such as the common cold. It’s important to take the full dosage schedule of Avelox, even if you’re feeling better in a few days. Not completing the full dosage schedule may decrease the drug’s effectiveness and increase the chances that the bacteria may become resistant to Avelox and similar antibiotics.

Be sure to drink plenty of fluids while taking Avelox.

* If you miss a dose…
Take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and go back to your regular schedule. Do not take a double dose in an effort to “catch up.”

* Storage instructions…
Store Avelox at room temperature. Avoid high humidity.

What side effects may occur?
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Most people taking Avelox do not experience side effects; and when reactions do occur, they are usually mild. If you do develop a side effect, however, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Avelox.

* Side effects may include:
Abdominal pain, anemia, anxiety, decreased blood pressure, diarrhea, dizziness headache, drowsiness, insomnia, joint and muscle pain, nausea, nervousness, rapid heartbeat, rash, sweating

Why should Avelox not be prescribed?
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If you have ever had an allergic reaction to any other quinolone antibiotic, such as ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, enoxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin hydrochloride, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, or you should not take Avelox.
Special warnings about Avelox
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Avelox may make you dizzy or light-headed. Do not drive a car, operate machinery, or engage in activities requiring mental alertness or coordination until you know how the drug affects you.

Avelox can cause certain heart irregularities in people already prone to the problem. If you are being treated for an abnormal heartbeat, make sure the doctor is aware of it. You may have to avoid Avelox. Also tell the doctor if you or anyone in your family has a history of heart problems. If you develop palpitations or fainting spells while taking Avelox, contact your doctor immediately.

Before you take Avelox, you should tell your doctor if you have a history of convulsions or blockage of the arteries in the brain. Quinolone-type antibiotics like Avelox have been known to cause convulsions and other problems with the nervous system, including symptoms such as agitation, anxiety, dizziness, confusion, depression, hallucinations, nervousness, nightmares, tremors, and suicidal thoughts. Contact your doctor immediately if you experience any of these reactions.

Avelox may cause Achilles and other tendon ruptures, especially in older adults and those taking steroids. If you experience pain or inflammation in a tendon contact your doctor. Like other antibiotics, it can also cause serious intestinal inflammation. If you develop diarrhea, let your doctor know immediately.

Rare cases of peripheral neuropathy (changes or disturbances of the nervous system) have been reported with this type of antibiotic. Contact your doctor if you experience muscle weakness, paralysis, pain or numbness, a burning sensation, or a “pins and needles” sensation.

Avelox can make your skin more sensitive to light, so you should avoid excess sunlight and tanning beds.

You should avoid Avelox if you have a low level of potassium in your blood. Low potassium can be caused by the water pills (diuretics) often prescribed for high blood pressure. If you are taking a diuretic, make sure the doctor knows about it before you begin treatment with Avelox.

A case of diarrhea during Avelox therapy could signal development of a potentially dangerous bowel inflammation. Call your doctor for treatment at the first sign of a problem.

Avelox has not been tested in children under 18.
Possible food and drug interactions when taking Avelox
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Multivitamins containing iron or zinc; antacids containing magnesium, calcium, or aluminum; sucralfate; or didanosine reduce the effectiveness of Avelox. Take it at least 4 hours before or 8 hours after any of these products.

Do not take Avelox with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as Advil, Motrin, and Naprosyn because it may increase the risk of nerve stimulation and convulsions.

Other drugs to use cautiously while taking Avelox include:
AmiodaroneAntipsychotic drugs such as chlorpromazine, haloperidol, and trifluoperazineErythromycinProcainamideQuinidineSotalolTricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline hydrochloride, desipramine hydrochloride, and perphenazineWarfarin

You also should avoid Avelox if the amount of potassium in your blood is low. Low potassium can sometimes be caused by diuretic medications such as Lasix. If you are taking a diuretic medicine, tell your doctor before taking Avelox. In fact, inform your doctor of all medications you are taking, including over-the-counter remedies.
Special information if you are pregnant or breastfeeding
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The effects of Avelox during pregnancy have not been studied. It should be used during pregnancy only if the benefits outweigh the possible risk to the unborn baby. If you are expecting, make sure the doctor is aware of it before you start taking this drug.

Avelox may appear in breast milk and could affect a nursing infant. If this medication is essential to your health, your doctor may advise you to discontinue breastfeeding until your treatment is finished.
Recommended dosage for Avelox
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ADULTS

Acute Bacterial Sinusitis

The usual dose is one 400-milligram tablet daily for 7 to 14 days.

Acute Bacterial Infection with Chronic Bronchitis

The usual dose is one 400-milligram tablet daily for 5 days.

Pneumonia

The usual dose is one 400-milligram tablet daily for 7 to 14 days.

Skin Infections

The usual dose is one 400-milligram tablet daily for 7 days.
Overdosage
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Any medication taken in excess can have serious consequences. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately.

* Symptoms of Avelox overdose may include:
Convulsions, decreased activity, diarrhea, sleepiness, tremors, vomiting

Avelox

Avelox
moxifloxacin (moxi FLOX a sin)
Avelox, Avelox I.V.

What is the most important information I should know about Avelox?
• Use the Avelox for as many days as it was prescribed for you, even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated.
• Do not use Avelox without first talking to your doctor if you or any member of your family have a heart condition known as long QT syndrome. Also, do not use Avelox if you are also using a heart rhythm medicine such as quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), sotalol (Betapace), and others.
• Certain other medicines you may be using can decrease the effectiveness of Avelox and must be used at least 4 hours after or 8 hours before you use Avelox. Some of these medicines are antacids that contain magnesium, calcium, or aluminum (such as Tums, Rolaids, Maalox, and others); the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate); vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc; or didanosine chewable/buffered tablets or pediatric powder for oral solution (ddI, Videx, Videx Pediatric, and others).
• Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Avelox may cause dizziness. If you experience dizziness, avoid these activities.

What is Avelox?
Avelox is an antibiotic in the class of drugs called fluoroquinolones. It fights bacteria in the body.
Avelox is used to treat bacterial infections.
Avelox may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Avelox?
• Do not use Avelox without first talking to your doctor if you or any member of your family have a heart condition known as long QT syndrome. Also, do not use Avelox if you are also using a heart rhythm medicine such as quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), sotalol (Betapace), and others.
• Before taking Avelox, tell your doctor if you have
· a low level of potassium in your blood;
· a slow heart rate;
· heart disease;
· liver disease; or
· epilepsy or another seizure disorder.
• You may not be able to use Avelox or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you have any of these conditions.
Avelox is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether Avelox will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not use Avelox without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment.
• It is unknown whether Avelox passes into breast milk. Do not use Avelox without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
Avelox is not approved for use by children younger than 18 years old.

How should I use Avelox?
• Use Avelox exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.
• Use each oral dose with a full glass (8 ounces) of water. Drink plenty of fluid while taking Avelox.
Avelox can be used with or without food.
Avelox is usually used once a day. Use each dose at the same time every day. Follow your doctor’s instructions.
Avelox may also be given by a healthcare provider by intravenous (IV) infusion.
• Use the Avelox for as many days as it was prescribed for you, even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated.
• This medication will not treat a viral infection, such as flu or common cold.
• Certain other medicines you may be using can decrease the effectiveness of Avelox and must be used at least 4 hours after or 8 hours before you use Avelox. Some of these medicines are antacids that contain magnesium, calcium, or aluminum (such as Tums, Rolaids, Maalox, and others); the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate); vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc; or didanosine chewable/buffered tablets or pediatric powder for oral solution (ddI, Videx, Videx Pediatric, and others).
• Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?
• Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and use the next one as directed. Do not use extra medicine to make up for a missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?
• Seek emergency medical attention.
• Symptoms of a Avelox overdose include seizures, poor coordination, tremors, sleepiness, vomiting and diarrhea.

What should I avoid while taking Avelox?
• Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight. Although it has not been reported with the use of Avelox, other similar medicines have caused increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight. Severe sunburn has resulted, even with minimal sun exposure. If you must be out in the sun while using Avelox, wear protective clothing and use sunscreen. Call your doctor if you experience severe burning, redness, itching, rash, or swelling after exposure to the sun.
• Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Avelox may cause dizziness. If you experience dizziness, avoid these activities.

What are the possible side effects of Avelox?
• If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop using Avelox and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately:
· an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives);
· irregular or rapid heartbeat;
· bloody or watery diarrhea;
· fainting;
· seizures;
· liver damage (yellowing of the skin or the whites of your eyes, nausea, stomach pain or discomfort, unusual bleeding or bruising, severe fatigue);
· sudden pain or swelling near your joints (especially in your arm or ankle); or
· skin rash.
• If you experience any of the following less serious side effects, continue using Avelox and talk to your doctor:
· nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain;
· dizziness;
· nervousness, anxiety, or sleep problems; or
· increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight.
• Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.
• If you have diarrhea while using Avelox, call your doctor before using any medicine to stop the diarrhea, especially if it is watery or contains blood.

What other drugs will affect Avelox?
• Certain other medicines you may be using can decrease the effectiveness of Avelox and must be taken at least 4 hours after or 8 hours before you use Avelox. Some of these medicines are antacids that contain magnesium, calcium, or aluminum (such as Tums, Rolaids, Maalox, and others); the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate); vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc; or didanosine chewable/buffered tablets or pediatric powder for oral solution (ddI, Videx, Videx Pediatric, and others).
• Before using Avelox tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:
· heart medicines such as quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), sotalol (Betapace);
· a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), amoxapine (Asendin), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), doxepin (Sinequan);
· warfarin (Coumadin); or
· a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin, others), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Anaprox), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis, Oruvail), and others.
· a phenothiazine such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), mesoridazine (Serentil), thioridazine (Mellaril);
· erythromycin (E-Mycin, Ery-Tab, E.E.S.); or
· cisapride (Propulsid).
• You may not be able to use Avelox, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are using any of the medicines listed above.
• Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with Avelox. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before using any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products.

Where can I get more information?
• Your pharmacist has additional information about Avelox written for health professionals that you may read.
• Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
• Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. (’Multum̵ ;) is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum’s drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum’s drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are using, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
Click here for more information on Avelox from the manufacturer.